You Need

Telesales Administrator (Nelspruit)

Advertising, Marketing,
PR, Media and Digital

Jhb: 011 883 5404
CT: 021 422 3590 www.adtalent.co.za
    

Recruiters & Career Coaches in Advertising, Marketing and Media Industries

Lynn: 082 802 4441 (Advertising/Digital/Media)

az.oc.dauqskroweht@nnyl


Jo-Anne: 084 200 1703 (Marketing/Sales/PR)

az.oc.dauqskroweht@ennaoj

    

Recruitment Specialists since 1989

Rob Jones:

az.oc.llywel@jbor


Michelle Jones:

az.oc.llywel@jhcim


Tel: 011 465 9368
www.lewyll.co.za

Permanent Part-Time Sales Assistant (Polokwane)

Cape Union Mart

Cape Union Mart International (Pty) Ltd has been equipping South African adventurers since 1933, and is South Africa’s favourite outdoor adventure store. Stocking everything one needs for outdoor pursuits – including hiking, camping, trail running, mountain biking, snow sports, travel and more – Cape Union Mart is an essential first step in every adventure. Cape Union Mart has stores across South Africa, and in Namibia and Botswana.

View company profile

Sales Assistant (Kathu)

Cape Union Mart

Cape Union Mart International (Pty) Ltd has been equipping South African adventurers since 1933, and is South Africa’s favourite outdoor adventure store. Stocking everything one needs for outdoor pursuits – including hiking, camping, trail running, mountain biking, snow sports, travel and more – Cape Union Mart is an essential first step in every adventure. Cape Union Mart has stores across South Africa, and in Namibia and Botswana.

View company profile

CRM Specialist (Cape Town)

Advertising, Marketing,
PR, Media and Digital

Jhb: 011 883 5404
CT: 021 422 3590 www.adtalent.co.za
    

Recruiters & Career Coaches in Advertising, Marketing and Media Industries

Lynn: 082 802 4441 (Advertising/Digital/Media)

az.oc.dauqskroweht@nnyl


Jo-Anne: 084 200 1703 (Marketing/Sales/PR)

az.oc.dauqskroweht@ennaoj

    

Recruitment Specialists since 1989

Rob Jones:

az.oc.llywel@jbor


Michelle Jones:

az.oc.llywel@jhcim


Tel: 011 465 9368
www.lewyll.co.za

Project Manager – Logistics/Procurement (Johannesburg)

All rights reserved. Copyright © 2018. Republish permission. ADSL & Web hosting proudly provided by Afrihost. Bizcommunity.com, its sponsors, contributors and advertisers disclaim all liability for any loss, damage, injury or expense that might arise from the use of, or reliance upon, the services contained herein. Privacy policy, Terms of Use, PAIA.

A Surprisingly Easy Trick to Control Overeating 

And the answer to why you always find yourself snacking.

Though it might be tempting to delay doing the dishes, new research may have you scrubbing sooner rather than later. According to a study conducted at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab, spending time in a cluttered and chaotic kitchen may cause us to double the amount of calories we consume. The results are published in Environment and Behavior.

The researchers began by splitting 98 female participants into two groups. One group was asked to write about a time when their lives felt in control, and the other group wrote about a time when their lives felt out of control. Half of the participants then waited in a messy, hectic kitchen—filled with newspapers, dirty dishes, and a ringing phone. The other half waited in a clean and quiet kitchen. Bowls of cookies, crackers, and carrots were available in both environments.

In just 10 minutes, the participants who wrote about a time when they felt out of control ate 53 more calories from cookies than the stressed-out women who entered the clean kitchen.

“Being in a chaotic environment and feeling out of control is bad for diets,” Lenny Vartanian, PhD., lead author of the study, said in a statement. “It seems to lead people to think, ‘Everything else is out of control, so why shouldn’t I be?’”

The group that wrote about feeling in control ate about 100 fewer total calories in the cluttered kitchen than those who went in feeling stressed—suggesting meditation might be a helpful technique (though the researchers suggest cleaning is likely the easiest solution).

Still feeling lazy? Washing the dishes is good for more than just our waistline. A previous study found that the household chore encourages a state of mindfulness, which can lead to reduced stress and improved well-being.

Spinach Salad With Fried Egg and Goat Cheese

How to Make It

Step 1

Place vinegar and shallot in a bowl; let stand 10 minutes. Add mustard, pepper, 3 tablespoons of the oil, and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt to bowl; whisk until well combined.

Step 2

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium. Add remaining 1 teaspoon oil; swirl to coat. Add eggs; cook until whites are set, 1 to 2 minutes. Turn over; cook 1 minute for runny yolks. Sprinkle with remaining salt.

Step 3

Divide spinach among 4 plates. Top each with 1 egg, 2 tablespoons goat cheese, 2 tablespoons blueberries, and 1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds. Drizzle with vinaigrette.

Print Sales Representative (Durban)

Advertising, Marketing,
PR, Media and Digital

Jhb: 011 883 5404
CT: 021 422 3590 www.adtalent.co.za
    

Recruiters & Career Coaches in Advertising, Marketing and Media Industries

Lynn: 082 802 4441 (Advertising/Digital/Media)

az.oc.dauqskroweht@nnyl


Jo-Anne: 084 200 1703 (Marketing/Sales/PR)

az.oc.dauqskroweht@ennaoj

    

Recruitment Specialists since 1989

Rob Jones:

az.oc.llywel@jbor


Michelle Jones:

az.oc.llywel@jhcim


Tel: 011 465 9368
www.lewyll.co.za

10 Simple Ways to Actually Enjoy Running

Though he’s now a pro trail runner—a two-time national champion, in fact—David Roche didn’t naturally love the sport. “I will always remember my first run when I went out the door, got 200 yards, and had to stop because I was so winded,” he says. “I was sore for three days afterward.”

The more he ran, the easier—and more fun—it felt. Eventually, he quit his job as an attorney to run, coach a team called Some Work, All Play, and write a forthcoming book (with his co-coach and wife Megan) called The Happy Runner Project.

“You don’t have to run—but if you’re going to run, it should be joyful,” Roche says. And even if you don’t plan to leave corporate life for the trails, you can still reap running’s emotional and physical rewards, he believes. “Definitely, anyone can enjoy it, and anyone can improve by massive amounts.” Here’s how to do both.

Slow down

Most new runners start off at a sprint and quickly flame out, much the way Roche did. Now, he knows better. “If it hurts, you’re going too hard,” he says. Your body needs time to both develop aerobic fitness and adapt to the impact and repetitive motions running involves.

When you first start out, alternate easy running and walking—say, a minute of each. Each week, adjust your intervals (running more, walking less) until you’re steadily jogging. Even then, don’t judge yourself on pace; instead, run by effort, and keep things relaxed. “Listen to your body,” he says.

Then, pick up the pace

That said, steady slogging can quickly grow monotonous. Once you’ve logged a few continuous runs, try adding in bursts of speed—20 to 30 seconds of faster running followed by at least a minute of slower running. Or, find a hill and run up it quickly, then slowly jog back down. Start with two to four bursts or hills, then build up week by week. Besides making time pass more quickly, these short, hard efforts boost your heart rate and help reduce your injury risk.

RELATED: How to Start Running Without Getting Hurt, According to Pros

Turn on some tunes

Music can literally move you. In a small study in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, runners clocked a speedier 5K with less effort when listening to either calm or upbeat melodies. Pro runner and coach Kaitlin Gregg Goodman (find her online at Running Joyfully) chooses different songs for different purposes: “relaxed if you’re trying to chill out on an easy day, a pump-up playlist for hard workouts,” she says.

Podcasts work too, and often come in workout-friendly 30- to 45-minute episodes (one of Roche’s favorites is NPR’s How I Built This). Note: If you’re running outside, consider using just one earbud to stay aware of your surroundings.

Grab a buddy

Running friends make the miles fly by, Roche says. And there’s no better way to multitask than catching up while you get your miles in. Can’t find a pal who’s game to stride with you? Search online or head to your local running store to seek out group runs; they often leave from stores, bars, and gyms. You might meet a brand-new friend who’s just your pace.

Focus your mind

Though training partners and music may serve as welcome distractions, actually tuning in to what you’re doing can also help you enjoy it more, notes Mackenzie L. Havey, a Minneapolis runner and coach and author of Mindful Running. “Research shows that mindful athletes tend to exhibit greater optimism, higher self-confidence, and less anxiety,” she says.

To start, spend the first few steps of your run doing a full scan of your body, mind, and the world around you, she recommends. Notice the feeling of your feet hitting the ground, the sound of birds chirping, the top three thoughts in your head. If you notice your mind wander—and you will—gently bring it back to the present moment. “You'll find that fully immersing yourself in the run by focusing on your environment, body, and mind boosts enjoyment, even on the days you're feeling less than inspired to work out,” she says.

RELATED: 5 Running Mistakes Beginners Always Make

Reframe your self-talk

Paying bills, feeding your kids, booking doctor’s visits—there’s plenty in life you have to do. Running, on the other hand, is a conscious choice you’re making to improve your health, fitness, and well-being. “I really like to say that it’s an opportunity, not an obligation,” Gregg Goodman says. Revel in the chance to test your limits, zap stress, and escape the day-to-day pressure of a busy life.

Bottle the beauty

When the going gets tough, focus on the splendor all around you. “It could be the way the leaves have fallen on the path or passing a child learning to ride a bike, or—my favorite—dog spotting,” says Chris Mosier, a four-time member of Team USA in duathlon and triathlon and a coach in Chicago. He always advises his athletes to keep an eye out for inspiring sights along their routes.

Extend those positive vibes by writing down the things you’re grateful for on the run (say, how fresh your legs felt or how fortunate you are to live near a running path) on slips of paper. Fold them up and put them in a used water bottle, Havey recommends. Pull them out when you’re lacking motivation—and over time, you’ll likely find yourself more tuned in to a sense of gratitude from the moment you lace up your running shoes.

RELATED: 11 Rules of Running Buddy Etiquette

Rethink your route

Gregg Goodman often notices runners retracing the exact same routes day in and day out. “I’ll put in their log: Your assignment for today is an exploration run,” she says. Bypassing your well-trod boulevard and seeking out a new sidewalk, path, or park adds an element of excitement to your routine. Another option is a destination run, a point-to-point course that ends up somewhere fun like a coffee shop or bookstore. Just take your phone and use a ride-sharing app to catch a lift home.

Time travel

On days when you can’t quite convince yourself that you like running, remind yourself of how good you’ll feel when you’re finished. “After the morning run, I’m going to be happier, I’ll be more productive, and my husband says I’m a better spouse,” Gregg Goodman says. “It’s like having coffee—we’re all much better people after coffee.”

To get our top stories delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Make it meaningful

Give your running purpose by setting a specific target, like completing a 5K or improving upon last year’s time. Reflecting on how much that goal means to you can help you appreciate every step in the process, Gregg Goodman says.

You can also dedicate your miles to a loved one who can no longer run, raise money for a charity, or pace a friend in an event that’s meaningful to him or her. “Sometimes running can feel like a pretty selfish endeavor,” Gregg Goodman says. “Making it bigger than yourself can bring that joy back.”

Internships

Internships in Kwazulu-Natal | Tourism/Hospitality Management | Job Mail | 4226491

This site uses cookies. By browsing this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read more about our use of personal information on our Privacy Policy. x

YDP recruits for some of the major hotel chains in the USA including Marriott hotels, Ritz Carlton and Hilton to name a few. 12 month paid internships are offered in Culinary, Front Office and Food and Beverage. To meet the requirements, you must be between 18-30, a hospitality student or recent graduate( level 5 and above) OR have 5 years work experience in either department mentioned above. Call YDP today on 0315847251, email your CV to vishona@ydp.co.za or to find out more about our international opportunities in the USA and Australia.

Get Alerts

To Apply for this Job,

Technician Maintenance

Technician Maintenance in Cape Town | Other Manufacturing | Job Mail | 4226539

This site uses cookies. By browsing this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read more about our use of personal information on our Privacy Policy. x

For expanding global leader offering path career growth and ongoing development. Trade Tested Millwright, Electrician or Fitter with supervisory skills, high level diagnostic root cause analysis experience. Project experience a plus. SA Citizens only. You will be contacted within two weeks if shortlisted. Email: multitech@telkomsa.net Telephone: 031 702 4500

Get Alerts

To Apply for this Job,

We bring what you need together in one site. No mess no fuss just what you need.

Use the form below to select the fields on which you want to search. Adding more fields makes for a more specific search. Using fewer fields will make for a broader search.

    • loading...